Sharing Knowledge

The conservation of our planet should be everyone’s concern, including scientists and non-scientists. However, limited success has been achieved alone; thus, working with the broader community is crucial for nature conservancy. Therefore, the PMBS is concerned with sharing our knowledge throughout the regions affected by our research, and we have attempted to integrate an increasing number of individuals to act in favor of conserving the environment. However, we not only disseminate knowledge but also believe in an exchange of information and learning. Our role is to inform and raise awareness for increasing numbers of people interested in conserving humpback whales and the overall marine environment.

Therefore, the PMBS has conducted activities together with individuals in all areas affected by our research. The dissemination of results to the media is also regarded as an important tool for reaching our goal. We have highlighted a number of the activities conducted by the PMBS:

 

 


Theatre: “Friends of the Fisherman”

A puppet play was held in a daycare center in the city of Nova Viçosa, Bahia, in 2007. The goal was to educate children on the humpback whale and South American dolphin, which are species that occur in the region and are frequently caught or injured by fishing nets. We show how the relationship between these animals and anglers can and should be friendly.

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Support Program for Environmental Debate

Set of lectures, discussions and practical activities conducted with teachers of the city of Nova Viçosa, Bahia, in 2007.

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Participation in the 20th Edition of the Whale Festival

An event was held in the city of Nova Viçosa, Bahia in 2013, and it focused on celebrating the humpback whale season in the coast of Bahia. The PMBS team was invited to present information to participants on humpback whales and the marine environment. Lectures, banner exhibitions and informational material distribution were performed throughout the event. In addition, recreational activities were conducted with local students and teachers.

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PMBS in the Media:

Project findings related to the humpback whale are also disseminated in the media. Accessible language has been used to engage and inform a large number of people on the topic.

  • State Agency:

Zerbini, A. N., Andriolo, A., Bonfiglioli, C. No rastro das jubartes [On the trail of the humpbacks]. Agência Estado, p. 1, 17 January 2003.

  • The Journal of Cetacean Research and Management:

Cover image: female humpback whale with her calf photographed off northeastern Brazil after a satellite transmitter was deployed on the mother (photo courtesy of Luciano Candisani, Instituto Aqualie/Projeto Monitoramento de Baleias por Satelite). The Journal of Cetacean Research and Management. Special Issue 3, 2011.

  • Biology Letters:

Cover image: female humpback whale with her calf photographed off northeastern Brazil after a satellite transmitter was deployed on the mother (photo courtesy of Luciano Candisani, Instituto Aqualie/Projeto Monitoramento de Baleias por Satelite). Biology Letters. 7(5), 2011.

  • Revista A3 [A3 Magazine] – Federal University of Juiz de For a [Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora – UFJF]:

Pesquisadores Monitoram por satélite a rota das baleias jubarte no litoral brasileiro [Researchers monitor by satellite the route of humpback whales on the Brazilian coast]. Revista de jornalismo científico e cultural da Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora [A3 scientific and cultural journalism magazine of the Federal University of Juiz de Fora] 2: 29-33, April to September 2012.

  • ARGOS Forum:

Zerbini, A.N., Andriolo, A., Clapham, P.J., Danilewicz, D. and Horton, T. Unveiling the mysteries of humpback whale movements and migration in the western South Atlantic Ocean. South America Environmental Monitoring. ARGOS Forum #76. CLS – Collecte Localisation Satellites, 2013.

  • Folha de São Paulo:

Satélite revela que baleias-jubartes mergulham a 300 metros de profundidade [Satellite reveals that humpback whales dive to 300 feet deep]. Reinaldo José Lopes (Collaboration for Folha) Folha de São Paulo, 23 June 2013.

  • Alaska Fisheries Science Center Quarterly Report:

Zerbini, A.N., Clapham, P.J., Wade, P.R. How Fast Do Whale Populations Grow? Investigating the Plausibility of Humpback Whale Rates of Increase from Life-history Data. Alaska Fisheries Science Center Quarterly Report, Seattle, United States, p. 11 – 12, 1 April 2010.

Waite, J.M., Zerbini, A. N. Whale survey off Brazil. Alaska Fisheries Science Center Quarterly Report, Seattle, United States, p. 15 – 16.